Membership

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The locks on the site designate that content is available only to members. Go to the Membership page to become a member.

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To purchase a new membership, click here.

How can I renew my membership?

To renew your membership, you must call customer service at 800-650-6787.

How do I change my password?

Click on the green person button in the far right corner of the screen and select "My Account". You can update your password on this page.

ACDIS is a community that welcomes idea sharing, networking, creative problem solving, and free and open speech and debate. As a result, we publish many papers, articles, news briefs, and informal commentary across our website. The question some members ask is: What articles represent ACDIS’ official stance, guidance, or advice on a particular question or issue?

To answer this question, we have established a “Hierarchy of Authority” detailing which articles are considered official ACDIS advice or guidance, and which are not. The most authoritative “ACDIS endorsed” publications are listed first.

1. ACDIS Position Papers: ACDIS Position Papers are the association’s official, consensus stance on an issue. ACDIS Position Papers set a recommended standard for the CDI industry to follow. They advocate on behalf of a certain position or offer concrete solutions for a particular problem. All current members of the ACDIS Advisory Board must review/approve a Position Paper and are encouraged to materially contribute to its creation. You can find ACDIS Position Papers here: https://acdis.org/resources?type=12

2. ACDIS White Papers: White Papers are next in the ACDIS hierarchy of authority. An ACDIS white paper discusses CDI best practice, advances new ideas, increases knowledge, or offers suggestions for administrative simplification. These can be written by a single ACDIS Advisory Board member, a smaller subset of the board, or can be written by external sources (when they are, they are clearly labelled as such). White Papers are less formal than a Position Paper but are peer-reviewed. You can find ACDIS White Papers here: https://acdis.org/resources?type=14

3. CDI Journal: Articles in our bi-monthly members-only CDI Journal are subject to editorial review and extensive editing prior to publication. But unless otherwise noted they do not represent official ACDIS recommendation or policy. ACDIS’ CDI Journal strives to use a variety of sources in its articles to ensure fair and accurate coverage. Occasionally the CDI Journal publishes opinion pieces and columns from industry experts. We strive to clearly mark these as such, and advice provided is general in nature and CDI staff should review the information to ensure compliance. While ACDIS Advisory Board members frequently write articles for CDI Journal the opinions expressed represent their own, not those of the association. You can find current and archived issues of CDI Journal here: https://acdis.org/articles/archive?publication=1

4. CDI Strategies: Unless otherwise noted CDI Strategies articles are summations of relevant news articles, recaps of local chapter activity, notifications of articles or downloads to the ACDIS website, or Q&As with industry representatives. These are curated, edited, and uploaded by ACDIS editorial staff but not peer-reviewed. You can find an archive of CDI Strategies articles here: https://acdis.org/articles/archive?publication=2

5. Forum posts, comments, and social media: Posts in ACDIS Forum, comments appended to the end of articles (via our Disqus plug-in) or on ACDIS Blog, and posts or replies to ACDIS social media platforms including Facebook, Instagram, and Twitter, are automatically assumed to be the opinions of the person posting the comment. Inappropriate or offensive posts will be removed.

 

To sum up, unless an article is a Position Paper, or an ACDIS White Paper (i.e., a White Paper written or approved by the ACDIS advisory board, not from an outside source), it is not considered official ACDIS guidance.

General note regarding articles on this website

Please note that ACDIS is an association of professionals governed by an elected advisory board and administrators. It is not a regulatory body. As in all matters, please refer to your manager, compliance department, and/or legal counsel before implementing changes or altering your organization’s policies and procedures.

How can I volunteer to serve on the ACDIS boards and committees?

Please visit the ACDIS Boards and Committees pages for additional details about the work our volunteer committees provide, the expectations of service, and selection processes. Typically, ACDIS puts out two calls for committee volunteers per year in January and June. However, should vacancies open at other times during the year, they shall be filled on a rolling basis.

Setting Forum Notifications

  1. Login to ACDIS
  2. Go to the forums
  3. Click “My Profile” under the person icon on the right
  4. Click the blue “preferences” link at the top of the profile page
  5. Select “Notification Preferences” on the right
  6. Check off the Categories you want to receive notifications from for both discussions and comments
  7. Click “Save Preferences”

Click here for a detailed tutorial on participating on the ACDIS Forum.

The quizzes for the bi-monthly CDI Journal can be accessed in the article list on the CDI Journal page. Go to the last page of the article listings for that issue to locate the quiz. We also provide a link to the quiz in the "Download Full Issue" page for each issue. 

Does ACDIS Radio offer CCDS or other CEUs, or does it offer materials or other handouts to listeners?

No, ACDIS Radio is a short, 30 minute, informal program that is conversational in nature and as such is not suitable for CEUs. No materials are provided in advance. From time to time speakers will supply .ppt slides or other materials, and if they do these are typically posted in the ACDIS Radio archives beneath the show recording.

ACDIS Radio is a free program for both members and non-members alike. Click here to register to listen live. Click here to subscribe to the podcast in Apple Podcasts/iTunes.

CCDS Certification

Is the CCDS recongized by the ANCC Magnet program?

ACDIS is proud to be recognized by the American Nurses Credentialing Center’s Magnet Recognition Program.

https://www.nursingworld.org/organizational-programs/magnet/accepted-certifications/

Click the link for the National Certifications Currently Included in the DDCT (xls) file and search for “Certified Clinical Documentation Specialist.”

How do I find out my recertification due date or verify an employee's credential?

Individuals who hold the CCDS must apply for recertification every two years. It is due on the anniversary of the date on which they passed the CCDS exam. That date is printed on the individual’s certificate. It is CCDS holder's responsibility to know their recertification due date. ACDIS sends multiple email reminders to the email address on file. ACDIS is not responsible for late, suspended, or revoked certifications.

Certification holders can look up their due date on the CCDS Certification Holders page using the posted PDF list. Employers can also use this list to verify their employee's credential.

Please email Certification Coordinator Penny Richards at prichards@acdis.org with any questions.

What are the benefits of the CCDS certification?

Benefits for the organization:

  • Allows the organization to identify those individuals who have demonstrated knowledge and skills that equip them to function as an effective clinical documentation specialist
  • Demonstrates that individuals are competent to provide ongoing education for physicians and other clinical staff
  • Ensures the maintenance of professional standards through the individuals’ commitment to continuing education to maintain certification and stay up-to-date on regulations and areas that are critical to accurate documentation, coding, and hospital quality initiatives
  • Provides the organization with peace of mind in knowing that, in an atmosphere of increased government scrutiny, compliance standards are met due to adherence with the ACDIS Code of Ethics

Benefits for the Clinical Documentation Specialist:

  • Encourages clinical documentation specialists to hold themselves to a higher standard and obtain the requisite knowledge and skills to fulfill their responsibilities effectively
  • Denotes that clinical documentation specialists have achieved a mark of distinction based on an acquired body of knowledge, skills, and experience
  • Establishes leadership within their profession and provide physicians and clinical staff with education regarding documentation requirements
  • Emphasizes the role of the clinical documentation specialist within the health information management (HIM) arena and establishes the clinical documentation specialist profession as key in ensuring healthcare data integrity
  • Encourages continued education to keep pace with changing government and private payer regulations and industry standards

What are the eligibility requirements?

Candidates for the Certified Clinical Documentation Specialist (CCDS) designation must meet educational and work experience requirements. To read a complete breakdown of the requirements, download the Exam Candidate's Handbook by clicking here. To download a quick reference flowchart, click here.

The candidate for the CCDS exam will meet one of the following three education and experience standards and currently be employed as either a concurrent or retrospective Clinical Documentation Specialist:

  • An RN, RHIA, RHIT, MD, or DO and two (2) years of experience as a concurrent/retrospective documentation specialist in an inpatient acute care facility using the United States IPPS system.
  • An Associate’s degree (or equivalent) in an allied health field (other than what is listed above) and three (3) years of experience as a concurrent/retrospective documentation specialist in an inpatient acute care facility using the United States IPPS system. The education component must include completed college-level course work in medical terminology and human anatomy and physiology.
  • Formal education (accredited college-level course work) in medical terminology, human anatomy and physiology, and disease process, or the AHIMA CCS credential, and a minimum of three (3) years of experience in the role as a concurrent/retrospective documentation specialist in an inpatient acute care facility using the United States IPPS system.

*Years of experience is defined as full time employment or greater than 2,000 hours/year

What is a concurrent documentation specialist?

The concurrent documentation specialist:

  • Reviews medical records daily and in the current time, while the patient is hospitalized
  • Works collaboratively using real-time conversation with physicians and medical team members caring for the patient
  • Uses his or her clinical knowledge to evaluate how the medical record will translate into coded data, including reviewing provider and other clinical documentation, lab results, diagnostic information, and treatment plans
  • Communicates with providers, whether in verbal discussion or by query, for missing, unclear, or conflicting documentation
  • Educates providers about optimal documentation, identification of disease processes that reflect severity of illness, complexity, and acuity to facilitate accurate coding
  • Understands complications, comorbidities, severity of illness, risk of mortality, case mix, and the impact of procedures on the billed record, and shares this knowledge with providers and members of the healthcare team

What is a retrospective documentation specialist?

The retrospective documentation specialist:

  • Daily reviews medical records of post discharge, pre-bill records
  • Works collaboratively using real-time conversation with physicians and medical team members who cared for the patient
  • Uses his or her clinical knowledge to evaluate how the medical record will translate into coded data, including reviewing provider and other clinical documentation, lab results, diagnostic information, and treatment plans
  • Communicates with providers, whether in verbal discussion or by query, for missing, unclear, or conflicting documentation
  • Educates providers about optimal documentation, identification of disease processes that reflect severity of illness, complexity, and acuity to facilitate accurate coding
  • Understands complications, comorbidities, severity of illness, risk of mortality, case mix, and the impact of procedures on the billed record, and shares this knowledge with providers and members of the healthcare team

Equivalent foreign medical graduate experience documenting in a medical record as a clinician or resident does not meet the experience requirement.

To learn more about your CCDS first steps, watch this video with CCDS Coordinator Penny Richards.

How do I apply for the examination?

Download the CCDS examination application, complete it, and submit it by fax, email, or U.S. mail as instructed on the application. To apply for the CCDS-O exam, click here.

To learn more about applying for the exam, watch this video with CCDS Coordinator Penny Richards. For more information about scheduling your exam, watch this video.

What is the examination content?

The examination content is based on analysis of the activities of clinical documentation specialists in a wide range of settings, hospital sizes, and circumstances. Input from a survey taken by members of the Association of Clinical Documentation Improvement Specialists (ACDIS), and the input and research of an advisory board comprised of experienced clinical documentation specialists, was used to identify seven core competencies with which clinical documentation specialists should have a strong working knowledge.

Click here to read the CCDS Exam Candidate's Handbook which includes a content outline for the CCDS exam starting on p. 14, and a content outline for the CCDS-O exam starting on p. 24.

Note: The current version of the CCDS exam includes questions based on the following:

To learn more about the exam day, watch this video with CCDS Coordinator Penny Richards.

What types of questions are on the examination?

The examination is an objective, multiple-choice test consisting of 140 questions. The examination questions are designed to test the candidate's multidisciplinary knowledge of clinical, coding, and healthcare regulations, as well as the roles and responsibilities of a clinical documentation specialist. The questions are updated on a continuous basis to keep them relevant to current realities in healthcare. Choices of answers to the examination questions will be identified as A, B, C, or D.

  • Recall questions test the candidate's knowledge of specific facts and concepts relevant to the day-to-day work of clinical documentation professionals.
  • Application questions require the candidate to interpret or apply information, guidelines, or rules to a particular situation.
  • Analysis questions test the candidate's ability to evaluate and integrate a range of information in problem solving to address a particular challenge.

The current examination is designed so that approximately 40% of the questions will be of the recall type, 40% of the application type, and 20% of the analysis type.

To learn more about the exam day, watch this video with CCDS Coordinator Penny Richards.

Who administers the exam?

The Association of Clinical Documentation Improvement Specialists (ACDIS) contracts with Applied Measurement Professionals, Inc., (AMP), a PSI Business, to provide management and examination services. AMP provides administrative support for the certification process, including examination development, validation, and administration. AMP carefully adheres to industry standards for development of practice-related, criterion-referenced examinations to assess competency.

ACDIS maintains all CCD program records, handles finances, and processes examination and re-examination applications, and the recertification processes, including requests for continuing education approval.

To learn more about scheduling your CCDS exam, watch this video with CCDS Coordinator Penny Richards.

How is the examination administered?

To become a Certified Clinical Documentation Specialist (CCDS) or a Certified Outpatient Clinical Documentation Specialist (CCDS-O), a candidate must pass the examination. The exam is offered by computer at more than 300 PSI/AMP Assessment Centers located around the country (visit www.goamp.com and follow the links to find locations and directions).

Candidates who apply to take the examination will be contacted when they have been approved to take the examination.

Candidates have three months/90 days from the date their name is submitted to the exam company to schedule and take their examination.

There are no application deadlines and a candidate who meets eligibility requirements may submit an application and fee at any time. The fee will not be processed until the application is approved.

To learn more about the exam day, watch this video with CCDS Coordinator Penny Richards. To learn more about scheduling your exam, watch this video.

Are any resources allowed during the examination?

Candidates may bring the following with them into the test:

  • DRG Expert, published by OPTUM, must be and ICD-10 edition. The 2018 edition is published in two volumes and both are permited for the exam.
  • One of the following standard drug reference guides:
    • Nursing Drug Handbook/Lippincott’s
    • Mosby’s Nursing Drug Reference
    • Physicians’ Desk Reference (or PDR Nurse’s Drug Handbook)
    • Pearson’s Nurse’s Drug Guide
    • Saunders Nursing Drug Handbook
    • Davis’s Drug Guide

Books will be checked for additional pages or loose notes inserted or attached inside. These are not allowed to be brought into the examination room. Page tabs are permitted.

To learn more about the exam day, watch this video with CCDS Coordinator Penny Richards. For more tips about your exam day, read the CCDS Exam Candidates Handbook.

What are the passing score and pass rate?

The passing score is 88 correct out of 120 scored questions. The pass rate for first-time exam takers in 2018 was roughly 77%.

To learn more about CCDS exam results, watch this video with CCDS Coordinator Penny Richards.

Can I earn CCDS continuing education credits through my ACDIS membership?

Yes! ACDIS Members can earn 10 free CEUs each year. Take the quiz with each edition of CDI Journal quiz (published six times a year) and earn one CEU per edition. Participate in the ACDIS quarterly conference calls and earn one CEU for compelting the accompanying survey. To read more about earning CCDS CEUs, click here. Click here for more information about recertifying both the CCDS and CCDS-O credentials at once.

To learn more about CCDS recertification, watch this video with CCDS Coordinator Penny Richards.

CCDS-O Certification

What are the benefits of the CCDS-O certification?

Benefits for the organization:

  • Allows the organization to identify those individuals who have demonstrated knowledge and skills that equip them to function as an effective outpatient clinical documentation specialist
  • Demonstrates that individuals are competent to provide ongoing education for physicians and other clinical staff
  • Ensures the maintenance of professional standards through the individuals’ commitment to continuing education to maintain certification and stay up-to-date on regulations and areas that are critical to accurate documentation, coding, and reimbursement
  • Provides the organization with peace of mind in knowing that, in an atmosphere of increased government scrutiny, compliance standards are met due to adherence with the ACDIS Code of Ethics

Benefits for the Clinical Documentation Specialist:

  • Encourages clinical documentation specialists to hold themselves to a higher standard and obtain the requisite knowledge and skills to fulfill their responsibilities effectively
  • Denotes that clinical documentation specialists have achieved a mark of distinction based on an acquired body of knowledge, skills, and experience
  • Provides a visible mark of distinction within the organization and the broader CDI profession
  • Emphasizes the role of the clinical documentation specialist in the outpatient setting and establishes the clinical documentation specialist profession as key in ensuring healthcare data integrity
  • Encourages continued education to keep pace with changing government and private payer regulations and industry standards

What are the eligibility requirements for the CCDS-O?

Candidates for the Certified Outpatient Clinical Documentation Specialist (CCDS-O) designation must meet educational and work experience requirements. To read a complete breakdown of the requirements, download the Exam Candidate's Handbook by clicking here.

Candidates for the CCDS exam must meet one of the following two education and experience standards:

  • An RN, MD, DO, or coding certification (RHIA, RHIT, CCS, CPC, CRC, COC) and two (2) years of experience as an outpatient documentation specialist using United States reimbursement systems.
  • An RN, MD, DO, or coding certification (RHIA, RHIT, CCS, CPC, CRC, COC), one (1) year of experience as an outpatient clinical documentation specialist, and one (1) year of experience as an inpatient documentation specialist using United States reimbursement systems.

A year of experience is defined as full-time employment or greater than 2,000 hours worked during that year.

Experience documenting in a medical record as a clinician, resident or equivalent foreign medical graduate does not meet the experience requirement.

What is an outpatient documentation specialist?

These functions define the role of an outpatient documentation specialist:

  • Conducts reviews of medical records for patients in a variety of outpatient settings including but not limited to physician offices, physician and hospital-owned clinics, ambulatory surgery centers, and hospital emergency departments.
  • Collaborates with physicians and medical team members caring for the patient to clarify clinical documentation
  • Applies their clinical knowledge to evaluate how the medical record will translate into coded data, including reviewing provider and other clinical documentation, chronic disease processes, medications and their indications, diagnostic information, and treatment plans
  • Communicates with providers, whether in verbal discussion or by query, for missing, unclear or conflicting documentation
  • Educates providers about optimal documentation and identification of disease processes to ensure proper reflection of severity of illness, complexity, and acuity, and facilitate accurate coding and billing
  • Understands risk adjusted payment methodologies, professional coding and billing, and outpatient facility coding and billing, and share this knowledge with providers and members of the healthcare team

How do I apply for the CCDS-O examination?

Download the CCDS-O examination application, complete it, and submit it by fax, email, or U.S. mail as instructed on the application.

To learn more about applying for the exam, watch this video with Certification Coordinator Penny Richards. For more information about scheduling your exam, watch this video.

What is the CCDS-O examination content?

The CCDS-O examination is based upon five major content areas. Each of the content areas is briefly described and followed by an outline of the topics included in the area. In addition, the number of examination questions devoted to each major content area is noted.

The examination is composed of 140 multiple-choice questions.

Each question on the examination is categorized by a cognitive level that a candidate would likely use to respond. These categories are:

  • Recall: The ability to recall or recognize specific information
  • Application: The ability to comprehend, relate, or apply knowledge to new or changing  situations
  • Analysis: The ability to analyze and synthesize information, determine solutions, and/or  evaluate the usefulness of a solution

Click here to read the Exam Candidate’s Handbook, which includes a content outline for the CCDS-O exam starting on p. 24.

Note: The current version of the CCDS-O exam includes questions based on the following:

What types of questions are on the CCDS-O examination?

The examination is an objective, multiple-choice test consisting of 140 questions. The examination questions are designed to test the candidate's multidisciplinary knowledge of clinical, coding, and healthcare regulations, as well as the roles and responsibilities of an outpatient clinical documentation specialist. The questions are updated on a continuous basis to keep them relevant to current realities in healthcare. Choices of answers to the examination questions will be identified as A, B, C, or D.

The examination is composed of 140 multiple-choice questions. Each question on the examination is categorized by a cognitive level that a candidate would likely use to respond. These categories are:

  • Recall: The ability to recall or recognize specific information
  • Application: The ability to comprehend, relate, or apply knowledge to new or changing  situations
  • Analysis: The ability to analyze and synthesize information, determine solutions, and/or  evaluate the usefulness of a solution

Who administers the exam?

The Association of Clinical Documentation Improvement Specialists (ACDIS) contracts with Applied Measurement Professionals, Inc., (AMP), a PSI Business, to provide management and examination services. AMP provides administrative support for the certification process, including examination development, validation, and administration. AMP carefully adheres to industry standards for development of practice-related, criterion-referenced examinations to assess competency.

ACDIS maintains all CCDS-O program records, handles finances, and processes examination and re-examination applications, and the recertification processes, including requests for continuing education approval.

How is the CCDS-O examination administered?

To become a Certified Outpatient Clinical Documentation Specialist (CCDS-O), a candidate must pass the examination. The exam is offered by computer at more than 300 PSI/AMP Assessment Centers located around the country (visit www.goamp.com and follow the links to find locations and directions).

Candidates who apply to take the examination will be contacted when they have been approved to take the examination.

Candidates have three months/90 days from the date their name is submitted to the exam company to schedule and take their examination.

There are no application deadlines and a candidate who meets eligibility requirements may submit an application and fee at any time. The fee will not be processed until the application is approved.

To learn more about the exam day, watch this video with CCDS Coordinator Penny Richards. To learn more about scheduling your exam, watch this video.

Are any resources allowed during the CCDS-O examination?

Candidates taking the CCDS-O exam may to use one of the following drug reference guide during the exam:

  • Nursing Drug Handbook/Lippincott’s
  • Mosby’s Nursing Drug Reference
  • Physicians’ Desk Reference (or PDR Nurse’s Drug Handbook)
  • Pearson’s Nurse’s Drug Guide
  • Saunders Nursing Drug Handbook
  • Davis’s Drug Guide

Books will be checked for additional pages or loose notes inserted or attached inside. These are not allowed to be brought into the testing room. Tabs are permitted in books as are handwritten notes previously written in the margins of books. Candidates may not write in their books during the exam.

What are the passing score and the overall pass rate for the CCDS-O?

The CCDS-O exam launched in test centers nationwide in April 2019 and the cut score has been set to 85 out of 120, meaning that the exam candidate must get 85 questions correct out of the possible 120 test questions. ACDIS will publish the overall pass rate as soon as it is made available during testing.

Can I earn CCDS-O continuing education credits through my ACDIS membership?

Yes! ACDIS Members can earn 10 free CEUs each year. Take the quiz with each edition of CDI Journal quiz (published six times a year) and earn one CEU per edition. Participate in the ACDIS quarterly conference calls and earn one CEU for completing the accompanying survey. To read more about earning CEUs, click here.

Also, please note that CCDS CEUs may be used toward your CCDS-O recertification. Click here for more information about recertifying both credentials at once.

ACDIS Publications

When does ACDIS publish articles? How can I access them?

ACDIS publishes articles in three publications: The ACDIS Blog, CDI Strategies, and the CDI Journal.

The Blog publishes four times per week, Monday through Friday (excluding Thursdays). Articles on the Blog are a mix of contributed guest articles, Q&As with industry experts, book excerpts from ACDIS’ library, and ACDIS news and updates. The Blog is free and open to both ACDIS members and non-members.

CDI Strategies is ACDIS’ free weekly eNewsletter that is sent to subscribers every Thursday. Each edition includes a note from one of the ACDIS leadership team members, several news items pertinent to the CDI profession, a Q&A with one of our Boot Camp instructors, ACDIS news, and a listing of upcoming local chapter events. Articles in CDI Strategies are free and open to both ACDIS members and non-members. Anyone can subscribe to get the newsletter straight to their email inbox by clicking here.

The CDI Journal is ACDIS’ bi-monthly members-only publication that typically includes a dozen-plus articles in more than 30 pages of industry-focused topics. Each edition includes a mix of contributed articles and case studies from the ACDIS membership, featured articles written by ACDIS staff, insight from industry experts, and more. The Journal is a benefit of ACDIS membership and is not open to non-members.

What articles represent ACDIS’ official stance, guidance, or advice on a particular question or issue?

ACDIS has established a “Hierarchy of Authority” detailing which articles are considered official ACDIS advice or guidance, and which are not. The most authoritative “ACDIS endorsed” publications are listed first.

  1. ACDIS position papers: ACDIS position papers are the association’s official, consensus stance on an issue. ACDIS position papers set a recommended standard for the CDI industry to follow. They advocate on behalf of a certain position or offer concrete solutions for a particular problem. All current members of the ACDIS Advisory Board must review/approve a position paper and are encouraged to materially contribute to its creation. You can find ACDIS position papers here.
  2. ACDIS white papers: White papers are next in the ACDIS hierarchy of authority. An ACDIS white paper discusses CDI best practice, advances new ideas, increases knowledge, or offers suggestions for administrative simplification. These can be written by a single ACDIS Advisory Board member, a smaller subset of the board, or can be written by external sources (when they are, they are clearly labelled as such). White papers are less formal than position papers but are peer-reviewed. You can find ACDIS white papers here.
  3. CDI Journal: Articles in our bi-monthly members-only CDI Journal are subject to editorial review and extensive editing prior to publication. But unless otherwise noted they do not represent official ACDIS recommendation or policy. ACDIS’ CDI Journal strives to use a variety of sources in its articles to ensure fair and accurate coverage. Occasionally the CDI Journal publishes opinion pieces and columns from industry experts. We strive to clearly mark these as such, and advice provided is general in nature and CDI staff should review the information to ensure compliance. While ACDIS Advisory Board members frequently write articles for CDI Journal the opinions expressed represent their own, not those of the association. You can find current and archived issues of CDI Journal here.
  4. CDI Strategies: Unless otherwise noted CDI Strategies articles are summations of relevant news articles, recaps of local chapter activity, notifications of articles or downloads to the ACDIS website, or Q&As with industry representatives. These are curated, edited, and uploaded by ACDIS editorial staff but not peer-reviewed. You can find an archive of CDI Strategies articles here.
  5. Forum posts, the ACDIS Blog, and social media: Posts in ACDIS Forum or on ACDIS Blog, and posts or replies to ACDIS social media platforms including Facebook, LinkedIn, Instagram, and Twitter, are automatically assumed to be the opinions of the person posting the comment. Inappropriate or offensive posts will be removed.

I’m interested in writing for one of ACDIS’ publications. What are the guidelines?

ACDIS accepts submissions for publication on the ACDIS Blog and in the CDI Journal. The ACDIS Blog is often the venue ACDIS recommends to new contributing writers and is a more informal space than the Journal.

To submit an article for the Blog, send your idea or draft to ACDIS Editor Linnea Archibald (larchibald@acdis.org). Blog posts tend to be between 500-700 words long and can be focused on whatever CDI topic the author desires, provided that it follows ACDIS’ Code of Ethics and does not contradict ACDIS’ published guidance. Submissions are reviewed on a rolling basis and will be subject to editorial review and approval prior to publication.

Submissions for the CDI Journal should also be sent to Archibald. Journal articles tend to be 750-1,500 words long and tend to be a bit more formal than Blog posts. While the topic is left to the author as with the Blog, each edition of the Journal does center around a particular theme and contributors are encouraged to submit articles related to those themes. The Journal is published on a bimonthly basis. The remaining 2019 topics and deadlines are as follows:

  • September/October: Denials management and appeals
    • Submission deadline: August 1
  • November/December: Payment and regulatory advancements
    • Submission deadline: October 1

Please note that all submissions, regardless of the contributor’s intended venue, will be reviewed editorially and placed in a particular publication as ACDIS sees fit, based on topic, style, and editorial needs.